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Photograph of excavated cellar

Excavations on Nevis

Description:

Photograph of excavation of a cellar on Mountravers Plantation, Nevis, Caribbean.

Creator: Bruce Williams

Date: 2003

Copyright: Elizabeth Rhodes

The Red Lodge, Bristol

The Red Lodge, Bristol

Description:

The Red Lodge, Park Row, Bristol. The Red Lodge, now a museum, is the last remaining building of the Young family estate. The Great House, also part of the estate, stood where the Colston Hall stands today. The Red Lodge was built in around 1590. In 1854 the house became the country’s first girls’ reform school, set up by the social pioneer Mary Carpenter.

Creator: BCC Museum

Date: 1590

Copyright: Copyright BCC Museum

Photograph of the Tobacco Factory

Photograph of the Tobacco Factory, Bristol

Description:

Photograph of the Tobacco Factory in Raleigh Road, Bristol. This is the remaining part of what was once a tobacco factory, it now houses a theatre, restaurant and bar. It was one of three in Bristol owned by WD and HO Wills. This particular factory was still making cigars up until 1983. Today, there is still a cigar factory in Bristol, on Winterstoke Road.
Architect George Ferguson is the owner/developer of the Tobacco Factory as it is today.

Creator: BCC Museum

Date: 2003

Copyright: Copyright BCC Museum

Cave inside The Ostrich Pub, Bristol

Cave inside the Ostrich pub

Description:

Photograph of the cave inside The Ostrich public house, Bristol, as seen from the lounge area. Local myth has it that the caves were linked to the slave trade. They are part of a larger sytem of caves called Redcliffe Caves, which the pub backs on to. These caverns were made by sand being dug out for glass making. It is very unlikely that enslaved Africans were brought here, as few came directly to Bristol. Prisoners of war from the French and Spanish wars in the 18th century were possibly held there before being moved to local gaols. They may have been used to dig out the sand.

Creator: BCC Museum

Date: 2003

Copyright: Copyright BCC Museum

Cave inside The Ostrich pub, Bristol

Cave inside The Ostrich Public House

Description:

Photograph of cave within The Ostrich public house in Bristol. Local myth has it that the caves were linked to the slave trade. They are part of a larger sytem of caves called Redcliffe Caves, which the pub backs on to. These caverns were made by sand being dug out for glass making. It is very unlikely that enslaved Africans were brought here, as few came directly to Bristol. Prisoners of war from the French and Spanish wars in the 18th century were possibly held there before being moved to local gaols.

Creator: BCC Museum

Date: 2003

Copyright: Copyright BCC Museum

Photograph of the suspension bridge

Photograph of the suspension bridge Bristol

Description:

Photograph of the Suspension Bridge in Clifton Bristol. Designed by Isambard Kingdom Brunel, the bridge was started in 1836 and completed five years after Brunels’ death. in 1864. The Bridge is a famous landmark in Bristol.

Creator: BCC Museum

Date: 2003

Copyright: Copyright BCC Museum

Historic site, The Ostrich pub, Bristol

The Ostrich pub Bristol

Description:

Photograph of Historic site, The Ostrich public house in Bristol. Dating back to at least 1745 the pub contains an interesting account of its history and of the port of Bristol at the time. One of its walls has been partly demolished to reveal the interior of one of the many caves under Redcliffe. On the wall opposite is a copy of a trade card for the pub, dated 1775, which features a young black man, probably a slave. Contrary to local myth, it is unlikely that the caves were used to house enslaved Africans, as only a few came to the city, rather they were bought in Africa by Bristol traders and taken straight to the plantations in the Caribbean for sale. The caves were probably used to house prisoners of war.

With thanks to the authors of the Slave Trade Trail around Central Bristol, Madge Dresser, Caletta Jordan, Doreen Taylor.

Creator: BCC Museum

Date: 2003

Copyright: Copyright BCC Museum

Library in Georgian House

Library in Georgian House

Description:

Photograph of library in Georgian House, Great George Street, Bristol completed in 1791.Photograph shows double desk and chairs.Two globes are shown with part of fireplace and part of mirror.The house was built and owned by sugar merchant John Pinney.

Creator: Elizabeth Rhodes/Roger Vaughn

Date: 2003

Copyright: Elizabeth Rhodes/Bruce Williams

Whiteladies Road

Whiteladies Road, Bristol

Description:

Modern day view of Whiteladies Road, Bristol. Local myth has it that this was where fashionable ladies promenaded with their black slaves in attendance.It is possible that the road ran alongside the grounds belonging to a convent. The name might come from the white habits worn by the nuns. The origins of the name is still debated.

Creator: BCC Museum

Date: 2003

Copyright: Copyright BCC Museum

Georgian House Housekeeper’s Room

Georgian House Housekeeper's Room

Description:

Photograph of housekeeper’s room in Georgian House, Great George Street, Bristol. The building (completed in 1791) is now a museum, but was built and owned by John Pinney (1740-1818). He was a sugar merchant who earned his fortune from his sugar plantations on the Caribbean island of Nevis. Photograph shows desk on left with keys and bills.Also shows central fireplace, pattern on the floor and kettle on the fire.

Creator: Elizabeth Rhodes/Roger Vaughn

Date: 2003

Copyright: Elizabeth Rhodes

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