Page 1 of 14 pages  1 2 3 >  Last »

Fine Shag tobacco

Tobacco wrapper

Description:

Wrapper for Ringers Sons’ Fine Shag tobacco.

“Even after the freeing of slaves in America in 1865, many African Americans continued to work on the tobacco and cotton plantations where they had previously worked as slaves.� This, and the attitude to black people generally, was reflected in the continued use of the image of a black man or woman on British tobacco packaging and advertising until about 1960.”

Reproduced with kind permission of Wills (now Imperial Tobacco).

Creator: Ringers and Sons

Date: unknown

Copyright: Copyright, Imperial Tobacco

Object ID:Bennett Collection

Best Bird’s Eye tobacco

Tobacco wrapper

Description:

Wrapper for WD and HO Wills’ Best Bird’s Eye tobacco.

“Even after the freeing of slaves in America in 1865, many African Americans continued to work on the tobacco and cotton plantations where they had previously worked as slaves.� This, and the attitude to black people generally, was reflected in the continued use of the image of a black man or woman on British tobacco packaging and advertising until about 1960.”

Reproduced with kind permission of Wills (now Imperial Tobacco).

Creator: WD and HO Wills

Date: unknown

Copyright: Copyright, Imperial Tobacco

Object ID:Foster Collection A13/6

Uncut wrappers

Sheet of tobacco wrappers

Description:

Sheet of uncut wrappers for Imperial Tobacco Company’s tobacco brands.

“Even after the freeing of slaves in America in 1865, many African Americans continued to work on the tobacco and cotton plantations where they had previously worked as slaves.� This, and the attitude to black people generally, was reflected in the continued use of the image of a black man or woman on British tobacco packaging and advertising until about 1960.”

Reproduced with kind permission of Wills (now Imperial Tobacco).

Creator: Imperial Tobacco Company

Date: unknown

Copyright: Copyright, Imperial Tobacco

Object ID:Bennett Collection

Black Jack tobacco

Tobacco wrapper

Description:

Wrapper for Wills and Sons’ Black Jack tobacco.

“Even after the freeing of slaves in America in 1865, many African Americans continued to work on the tobacco and cotton plantations where they had previously worked as slaves.� This, and the attitude to black people generally, was reflected in the continued use of the image of a black man or woman on British tobacco packaging and advertising until about 1960.”

Reproduced with kind permission of Wills (now Imperial Tobacco).

Creator: Wills and Sons

Date: unknown

Copyright: Copyright, Imperial Tobacco

Object ID:Foster Collection A13/47

Fine Shagg tobacco

Tobacco wrapper

Description:

Wrapper for WD and HO Wills’ Fine Shagg tobacco.

“Even after the freeing of slaves in America in 1865, many African Americans continued to work on the tobacco and cotton plantations where they had previously worked as slaves.� This, and the attitude to black people generally, was reflected in the continued use of the image of a black man or woman on British tobacco packaging and advertising until about 1960.”

Reproduced with kind permission of Wills (now Imperial Tobacco).

Creator: WD and HO Wills

Date: unknown

Copyright: Copyright, Imperial Tobacco

Object ID:Foster Collection A13/35

Superfine Shagg

Tobacco wrapper

Description:

Wrapper for WD and HO Wills’ Superfine Shagg tobacco.

“Even after the freeing of slaves in America in 1865, many African Americans continued to work on the tobacco and cotton plantations where they had previously worked as slaves.� This, and the attitude to black people generally, was reflected in the continued use of the image of a black man or woman on British tobacco packaging and advertising until about 1960.”

Reproduced with kind permission of Wills (now Imperial Tobacco).

Creator: WD and HO Wills

Date: unknown

Copyright: Copyright, Imperial Tobacco

Object ID:Foster Collection A2/1041

Superfine Shagg tobacco

Tobacco wrapper

Description:

Wrapper for WD and HO Wills; M James and Company’s Superfine Shagg tobacco.

“Even after the freeing of slaves in America in 1865, many African Americans continued to work on the tobacco and cotton plantations where they had previously worked as slaves.� This, and the attitude to black people generally, was reflected in the continued use of the image of a black man or woman on British tobacco packaging and advertising until about 1960.”

Reproduced with kind permission of Wills (now Imperial Tobacco).

Creator: WD and HO Wills

Date: unknown

Copyright: Copyright, Imperial Tobacco

Object ID:Foster Collection 949/10

Old Friend tobacco

Tobacco wrapper

Description:

Wrapper for WD and HO Wills’ Old Friend tobacco.

“Even after the freeing of slaves in America in 1865, many African Americans continued to work on the tobacco and cotton plantations where they had previously worked as slaves.� This, and the attitude to black people generally, was reflected in the continued use of the image of a black man or woman on British tobacco packaging and advertising until about 1960.”

Reproduced with kind permission of Wills (now Imperial Tobacco).

Creator: WD and HO Wills

Date: unknown

Copyright: Copyright, Imperial Tobacco

Object ID:Foster Collection 949/10

Stansfield’s Superfine Ragg tobacco

Tobacco wrapper

Description:

Wrapper for WD and HO Wills’ Stansfield’s Superfine Ragg tobacco.

“Even after the freeing of slaves in America in 1865, many African Americans continued to work on the tobacco and cotton plantations where they had previously worked as slaves.� This, and the attitude to black people generally, was reflected in the continued use of the image of a black man or woman on British tobacco packaging and advertising until about 1960.”

Reproduced with kind permission of Wills (now Imperial Tobacco).

Creator: WD and HO Wills

Date: unknown

Copyright: Copyright, Imperial Tobacco

Object ID:Foster Collection A2/1014

Superfine Shagg tobacco

Tin of tobacco

Description:

Tin of WD and HO Wills’ Superfine Shagg tobacco, possibly 1930s.

“Even after the freeing of slaves in America in 1865, many African Americans continued to work on the tobacco and cotton plantations where they had previously worked as slaves. This, and the attitude to black people generally, was reflected in the continued use of the image of a black man or woman on British tobacco packaging and advertising until about 1960.”

Reproduced with kind permission of Wills (now Imperial Tobacco).

Creator: WD and HO Wills

Date: c.1930s

Copyright: Copyright, Imperial Tobacco

Object ID:Wills Collection I 15/4

Page 1 of 14 pages  1 2 3 >  Last »