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Black and White on the Buses

Black and White on the Buses

Description:

Photograph taken from Black and White on the Buses, by M Dresser. Originally from Evening Post. Photographed are Audley Evans, Paul Stephenson and Owen Henry, regarding the bus boycott, 1960’s.

Creator: Evening Post

Date: 1960's

Copyright: Copyright BCC Museum

Eliza and Mable Head

Eliza and Mable Head

Description:

Eliza and Mable Head, daughters of Emma Head, grand-daughters of Henry Parker, runaway slave.

With thanks to Jenny Randall for the use of this item.

Date: 1902

Copyright: Lent to Bristol Museum and Art Gallery

RAF Airman UFG Walcott

RAF Airman UFG Walcott

Description:

Photograph of Airman UFG Walcott, RAF Bomber Command, 1944 – 1948. Fred Walcott joined the RAF in Barbados in the Caribbean and came to Britain in 1944. After the war he worked as an engineer. He settled in Bristol, and has been active in many local societies. In 1970, he was appointed as a Justice of the Peace.

With thanks to Mr and Mrs Walcott.

Date: 1940s

Copyright: Lent to Bristol Museum and Art Gallery

Sold Down the River

Sold Down the River by Tony Forbes

Description:

Painting, Sold Down the River , by Tony Forbes. Tony Forbes wrote about his painting:

_I really love this city. I was born in St Pauls and grew up on a white council estate called Southmead. There are things about Bristol Im proud of, but…

The Festival of the Sea in 1996 was an example of how some of the institutions that run the city have failed to understand the people of Bristol. They celebrated Bristols maritime history and ignored slavery. The centrepiece was the launch of the replica of John Cabots ship, the Matthew. His voyage in 1497 opened the way to the genocide of Native Americans and colonisation.
This festival, encouraged by the Council, funded by big business and hyped by our media, was a slap in the face to the black community and an insult to the intelligence and sensitivity of many Bristolians. It was the weekend that Bristol broke my heart.

The figure on the raft is a portrayal of the way I feel about how I have been treated by authority.The people I grew up with in Southmead have treated me as an equal regardless of colour: its all about respect. In the 1980s, Margaret Thatcher increased the powers of the police.The new sus laws were used against the white working-class as well as ethnic minorities.Black and white kids from the estates were picked up, and beaten up in the back of police vans or taken miles away from home and dumped – some policemen even used to defecate in your shoes and then tell you to walk home.

The Suspension Bridge is about Clifton. Clifton has all the privileges. The people I painted on the bridge are the ones who control and influence the city. I feel they dont give a damn about what happens to anyone else.

When I look at Colstons statue I just think of dead children. I can handle the fact that the statue is there, but theres nothing to say he was a slave trader.It was erected in 1895 by the people of Bristol. Over a century later, isnt it time for Bristolians to express their feelings about todays multi-cultural society?

What I am trying to show in the picture are some of the things I dont want to see happening to the next generation of kids, black or white. We have to live together.

Artists Statement, 1999._

Creator: Tony Forbes

Date: 1999

Copyright: Copyright BCC Museum

Object ID:K5894

Fort St Sebastian, West Africa

Fort St Sebastian, Ghana

Description:

Fort St Sebastian (Shama), Ghana, West Africa. This photograph of a trading fort in Ghana was taken in the 1950s. Forts such as this one were built around the 18th century by Europeans who used them as bases for trading. In particular, they were used for temporarily housing enslaved Africans until they could be loaded onto the waiting ships anchored nearby.

Date: c. 1950

Copyright: Copyright BCC Museum

Dixcove trading fort, West Africa

Dixcove trading fort, West Africa

Description:

Dixcove Trading Fort, (Kormantin), near Cape Coast, Ghana, West Africa. This photograph of a trading fort in Ghana was taken in the 1950s. Forts such as this one were built around the 18th century by Europeans who used them as bases for trading. In particular, they were used for temporarily housing enslaved Africans until they could be loaded onto the waiting ships anchored nearby.

Date: c. 1950

Copyright: Copyright BCC Museum

Blaise Castle House

Blaise Castle House

Description:

Blaise Castle House, 1969. Built by Thomas Farr, investor in slave trade. The Farrs were a family of ropemakers and slave traders.

Creator: Thomas Farr

Date: 1969

Copyright: Copyright BCC Museum

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