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Bill of lading for shoes

Bill of lading for shoes

Description:

Bill of lading for shoes shipped by Noblett Ruddock on the ship the Katherine from Bristol to Antigua, 1719. Ruddock was a merchant of Bristol with many trading interests. He invested in the trading of slaves and dealt in slave-produced goods such as sugar and tobacco.

A bill of lading is an official record of goods being carried on a ship.

Date: 1719

Copyright: Copyright BCC Record Office

Bill of lading for paper

Bill of lading for paper

Description:

Bill of lading for paper shipped by Noblett Ruddock on the ship the Hambleton from Bristol to Barbadoes, 1719. Ruddock was a merchant of Bristol with many trading interests. He invested in the trading of slaves and dealt in slave-produced goods such as sugar and tobacco.

A bill of lading is an official record of goods being carried on a ship.

Date: 1719

Copyright: Copyright BCC Record Office

Bill of lading; linen, clothing, twine

Bill of lading for linen, clothing, twine etc

Description:

Bill of lading for linen, clothing, twine etc, shipped by Noblett Ruddock on the ship the Katherine from Bristol to Antigua, 1719. Ruddock was a merchant of Bristol with many trading interests. He invested in the trading of slaves and dealt in slave-produced goods such as sugar and tobacco.

A bill of lading is an official record of goods being carried on a ship.

Date: 1719

Copyright: Copyright BCC Record Office

Bill of lading for herrings

Bill of lading for herrings

Description:

Bill of lading for herrings shipped by Noblett Ruddock on the ship the Hambleton from Bristol to Barbadoes, 1719. Ruddock was a merchant of Bristol with many trading interests. He invested in the trading of slaves and dealt in slave-produced goods such as sugar and tobacco.

A bill of lading is an official record of goods being carried on a ship.

Date: 1719

Copyright: Copyright BCC Record Office

Bill of lading for sugar

Bill of lading for sugar

Description:

Bill of lading for sugar shipped by Noblett Ruddock on the ship the George from Bristol to Dublin, 1719. Ruddock was a merchant of Bristol with many trading interests. He invested in the trading of slaves and dealt in slave-produced goods such as sugar and tobacco.

A bill of lading is an official record of goods being carried on a ship.

Date: 1719

Copyright: Copyright BCC Record Office

Bill of lading for tobacco

Bill of lading for tobacco

Description:

Bill of lading for tobacco shipped by Noblett Ruddock on the ship the Two Sisters from Bristol to Lisbon, 1789. Ruddock was a merchant of Bristol with many trading interests. He invested in the trading of slaves and dealt in slave-produced goods such as sugar and tobacco.

A bill of lading is an official record of goods being carried on a ship.

Date: 1719

Copyright: Copyright BCC Record Office

Newspaper extract, sailing of ship

Newspaper extract, sailing of ship

Description:

Newspaper extract from The Cornwall Chronicle, Jamaica. Advertisement for imminent sailing of the ship Foord to Bristol.

Date: 22 Dec 1781

Copyright: Copyright BCC Library Service

Newspaper extract, sailing of ship

Newspaper extract, sailing of ship

Description:

Newspaper extract from The Cornwall Chronicle, Jamaica. Advert for the imminent sailing of the ship Lord North to Bristol.

Date: 22 Dec 1781

Copyright: Copyright BCC Library Service

Newspaper extract, 620 slaves for sale

Newspaper extract, 620 slaves for sale

Description:

Newspaper extract from The Cornwall Chronicle, Jamaica . Advert for 620 slaves for sale from Bonny, West Africa, shipped on board the ship, Jane .

Date: 15 Dec 1781

Copyright: Copyright BCC Library Service

Newspaper extract, 450 slaves for sale

Newspaper extract, 450 slaves for sale

Description:

Newspaper extract from The Cornwall Chronicle, Jamaica. Advert for 450 slaves for sale on board the Lord Germaine ship.

Date: 15 Dec 1781

Copyright: Copyright BCC Library Service

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